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Remembering 60 Years Ago… It’s The Hottest Hits Of Early 1964!!! 

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The Hottest Hit In The World!

“I Wanna Hold Your Hand’ by The Beatles 

It’s quite perfect really, that I’m starting my coverage of the 60s at the beginning of 1964, with “I Wanna Hold Your Hand”, with the arrival of The Beatles, and thus the supposed beginning of the 60s proper. Everything before that – as great as it was and all – was, I dunno, the Poppy Kennedy Interzone? 

A good time then to ponder, what was it exactly that The Beatles – specifically the early “yeah, yeah, yeah” Beatles – brought to the table?  

As any glance of an early Beatles lyric sheet will prove, it certainly wasn’t the lyrics. Any Brill Building teen pop hit you can name – “He’s A Rebel” for example, or “Will You Love Me Tomorrow” or even “My Boyfriend’s Back” – is Shakespeare compared to “Love Me Do.” 

And it certainly wasn’t sex. As Jefferson Airplane’s Grace Slick complained, in the rock’n’roll history series Dancing In The Street

(a great series, infinitely more entertaining that Netflix’s This Is Pop, even if the documentary voice-overs are a little pompous.)

“When I first saw The Beatles I thought, ‘aren’t they a little old to be having bowl cuts… “I Wanna Hold Your…” come on, please, you wanna dick her! You wanna hold her hand at age 25? It’s a little too cute.”  

Grace Slick

Grace Slick may have sung on “We Built This City.” But she raises some valid points. 

The Beatles of “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” were virtually sexless. Even compared to the teen idols that came before them – and especially compared to the girl groups – their songs, or at least their lyrics, were remarkably chaste. 

I mean, even “It’s My Party” by Lesley Gore – of whom more about below – involves a scenario in which Johnny and Judy are, at the very least, giving each other a tongue-bath. 

Was it the hair? Brian Wilson seemed to feel more threatened by The Beatles haircuts than their music.

He claimed that “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” wasn’t even that good a record – complaining that The Beatles made the Beach Boys look more like gold caddies than rock’n’roll stars.  

Was it the one-liners? 

When The Beatles in America arrived on February 7th 1964 they held a press conference. One of the reporters asked how they felt about people saying they were nothing but four Elvises – I’m not sure why this was framed as an insult, surely four Elvises are better than one? – and Ringo went straight into a freaky Elvis dance whilst protesting “that’s not true, that’s not true!” Funny guy, that Ringo. 

There were also a lot of stupid questions about their hair: 

I guess that leaves the energy levels.  

The energy levels on those early Beatles records were exhilaratingly high! The early Beatles primary contribution to pop was primarily raising the bar of how exciting pop music could be, and how excited a band could sound to be playing it! 

The Beatles seem to be playing “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” as if they are excited about the very fact that they were in The Beatles.  

Brian Epstein claims he told Paul and John to write a song for the American market. Quite what that means, I don’t know. But “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” seems perfectly engineered for teenage girls to scream along too.

Complete with designated – “I can’t hide, I Can’t Hide, I CAN’T HIIIIIDDDDEEE!!!!!!”- scream along moments! A lot of the early Beatles records would have that. 

Given all of that, the famous Ed Sullivan performance is surprisingly, and ironically, lacklustre- and I’m pretty sure John’s singing is flat.

Although it’s nice to see that the screaming of The Beatles demographic stretched from gum-chewing nerdettes, all the way through to middle-aged pearl-necklace-wearing politician’s wives:

The studio version was obviously better. What it lacks in screaming girls, it more than makes up for in background handclaps:

“I Wanna Hold Your Hand” is a 10. 


Meanwhile in Surfing Land:

“Surfin’ Bird” by The Trashmen 

I am constantly confusing “Surfin’ Bird” with “Wipeout” by The Surfaris. It’s stupid, I know. The two songs have little in common.  

“Wipeout” has only one word. Plus an evil laugh.  

“Surfin’ Bird” has many words, even if many of those words are the same word. You know what word that is don’t you? I don’t need to tell you?* 

I’m sure Duane would have been a surf guitarist if he had grown up in California. But he didn’t. He was an Arizona boy – not a lot of surfing done down there – so country-twanging would be his lot. Anyway, if you’d ever wondered who it was humming and hollering in the background of “Rebel Rouser?”

Apparently, it’s The Rivingtons:

So, The Rivingtons had a hit with “Papa-Oom-Mow-Mow.” Which they describe in the song as “the funniest sound (they) ever heard.” And then they recorded another song called “The Bird Is The Word.”

Which was basically the same song. So much the same in fact, that The Trashmen seamlessly stuck them together, despite not being aware they were sung by the same band! It was simply obvious that those two songs belonged together:

Not only did The Trashmen stick the two songs together, they also sped the whole thing up until it virtually ceased to resemble music. It also ceased to resemble anything even close to sense. 

What does make sense however is that The Trashmen would make a record about a surfing bird that has nothing to do with surfing. After all, they did come from Minnesota. Not a lot of surfing done up there. 

“Surfin’ Bird” is a 9. 

*It’s “bird.” “Bird” is the word. Why is “bird” the word? Based on the artwork to The Rivingtons’ record, “the bird” is of course, like so many things in the early 60s, a dance. It seems to be far more complicated than Mr. Trashman’s version, which is just flapping your arms and running around in a circle.


Meanwhile in One Hit Wonder Land:

“Popsicles & Icicles” by The Murmaids. 

How much of a one-hit wonder were The Murmaids?  

Well, they only did one TV performance. One of the Murmaids – Terry – thinks they may have done two. Also, only one concert. So, chances are, although you’ve probably heard this “Mr. Sandman”-esque confection your entire life, you probably have no idea what The Murmaids look like. Unless you live in Los Angeles. Although even then, probably not. 

I am disappointed to report that they were not literal murmaids. Nor do they appear to have dressed up as murmaids in either of their rumoured television performances.  

No. Instead, they were three teenage girls from North Hollywood, two of whom were sisters, children of some mid-level show-biz parents. Or at least that’s who The Murmaids were on their one hit.

There are other Murmaids records with completely different girls. File it under record company dickery. It will not surprise you to learn that they also did not earn any royalties.

Neither were they informed when their record became first a national, and then an international, hit.  

“Popsicles & Icicles” are amongst the collection of interests and hobbies that The Murmaids’ boy is into. Those are two slightly surprising interests to have. Popsicles, I kind of get. But icicles? In Southern California? How did he have access to icicles in Southern California? Did he mention his love of icicles in his dating profile?

The result of his interests are pretty standard though: baseball, Levis, and drive-ins on Friday night. 

All this: The Murmaids sing as though they are having a tea party with their dolls. I almost expect them to inform us that boys are made of slugs and snails and puppy dogs tails. 

“Popsicles & Icicles” is a 6. 

Sometimes I confuse “Popsicles & Icicles” with the far, far, far perkier, “Sunshine, Lollipops and Rainbows” (it’s a 9) by our next artiste… 


Meanwhile In Feminist Anthem Land :

“You Don’t Own Me” by Lesley Gore 

Lesley Gore needed to reclaim her narrative. 

Before “You Don’t Own Me”, Lesley’s narrative had been defined by her relationship with that cheating-arsehole Johnny. Also with Johnny’s extremely brief relationship with that stuck-up bitch Judy.  

And sure, if it’s your party, and if you want to cry, you should be able to cry, if you want to. And sure, Lesley had gotten her own back on skanky-ho Judy in “Judy’s Turn To Cry”, because Johnny came back to Lesley. But that’s only after Lesley had kissed “some other guy,” at which point, Johnny hit, “some other guy.” Why? “Because he still loves me, that’s why!”  

Sadly, this did not lead to an additional sequel in which “some other guy” cries because he’s just been hit by Johnny for kissing Lesley. A song which would probably go like this: 

“Last night I went to a party, and I kissed Les-i-ley Gore, 

But then Johnny came up and punched me, and now my face is sore. 

Because I’m…. just some other guy, just some other guy, just some other guy…” 

Not Lesley Gore – 2024

After all of that, Lesley has now come to the realization that she’s in a terribly toxic relationship and that she needs to be her own woman. That she needs to define herself as something other than just one of Johnny’s “many toys: a line that suggests that Johnny wasn’t just sneaking around with Judy! How many girls was this guy dating at one time?!?!? 

That Lesley is about to lay down some uncomfortable truth-bombs is evident from the extremely foreboding first note. Johnny had better be careful.  Lesley’s first demand?

“Don’t tell me I can’t go with other boys.” Lesley, it appears, wants an open relationship.  

At some point however, Lesley’s demands become something bigger than just her relationship with Johnny. “You Don’t Own Me” swells up to address Lesley’s relationship with the world! 

Because she’s young! And she loves to be young! She’s free! And she loves to be free!  

Whilst certainly not the world’s first feminist anthem – not in a world where Kitty Wells’ “It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels” exists, not to mention the entire 1920s vaudeville blues scene – it was the first by a Baby Boomer, and that’s not nothing.

Particularly given how satisfying it is to hear Lesley kicking that bad boy Johnny to the curb. Even if she’s still obviously dating him. 

“You Don’t Own Me” is a 10.


Meanwhile in Soul Land:

“Um Um Um Um Um Um” by Major Lance 

Major Lance’s real name was Major Lance.  

Imagine being born with a name like Major Lance! Imagine how that would feel! There’s no way you wouldn’t walk everywhere with a strut! 

Major was good friends with Curtis Mayfield, who had already made a bunch of hit records with The Impressions and was already very clearly a genius. I mean, hell, he’d already written “Gypsy Woman.” 

Curtis had also already written “Um Um Um Um Um Um.” 

Curtis didn’t want to sing “Um Um Um Um Um Um” though, and you can kind of understand why. Curtis’ honeyed tones would simply be wasted just humming like that.

Also because: “Um Um Um Um Um Um” is silly. It makes no sense. 

In some ways Curtis has always reminded me of his spiritual descendent, Speech from 90s hippy hip-hop collective Arrested Development. Both had a very similar way of looking at the world. In “Mr Wendal” for example – one of Arrested Development’s biggest hits – Speech doesn’t just assume that a crazy homeless man is a crazy homeless man.

Instead, Speech decides to become friends with “Mr Wendal”, so that he can learn from him: 

Curtis doesn’t go that far on “Um Um Um Um Um Um.” But he does sit down next to a guy moaning “Um Um Um Um Um Um”, over and over again, and he asks him what it all means? The guy just moans “Um Um Um Um Um Um” once more. This does not clarify matters.  

Finally however, Curtis – or Major singing the words of Curtis singing the words of the guy moaning on a bench – understands. A woman has broken the moaning guy’s heart. 

This is some dark stuff for such a cheery song. 

“Um Um Um Um Um Um” is a 7. 

What a fascinating time to have been alive! 

To hear these, and other 60s hits, tune into DJ Professor Dan’s Twitch stream on Wednesdays at 8pm (Melbourne time), 9am London time, 1am L.A. time (technically Tuesday, but really Monday), middle of the night New York time!!!

https://www.twitch.tv/djprofessordan

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rollerboogie
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rollerboogie
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January 30, 2024 8:02 am

Good point about the Beatles and the energy level being a big part of their takeover. I hadn’t thought about it that way, but that’s what rock and roll had when it first burst on the scene and caused it to be such a cataclysmic sensation. It had by and large lost that original mojo by that point. It was ripe for something new, exciting, and exotic, and coming over from across the pond, the Beatles were certainly that. And Grace Slick can sneer all she wants, but the average young teen girl likely wasn’t quite yet interested in hearing what a 25 year old guy wanted. (and to be really nerdy and nitpick, none of them were quite 25 when they hit here.) The lads knew what they were doing, and Epstein’s insistence on them being marketed as clean cut when they really weren’t made them accessible to the masses at that point and time. The Stones would soon prove that there was more than one way to go.

lovethisconcept
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January 30, 2024 1:15 pm
Reply to  rollerboogie

Clean cut, but just shaggy enough that they still looked a bit rebellious. Perfect for teenage girls.

Zeusaphone
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January 30, 2024 9:37 am

The Beatles did a lot of technical stuff that sounded different from previous rock & roll. This is particularly evident from the covers they did on their early records. They didn’t change the arrangements in most cases which made those songs sound dated and tired next to the Beatles own music. When they did rearrange a cover, like on “Twist & Shout”, it made the song feel fresh again.

JJ Live At Leeds
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JJ Live At Leeds
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January 30, 2024 9:56 am

Grace Slick might not agree but there’s a reason all those girls were screaming and it’s not because they wanted a chaste relationship. The energy level played a part but that only served to intensify the already heightened emotional state.

As Phillip Larkin put it in his 1967 poem Annus Mirabilis

Sexual intercourse began
In nineteen sixty-three
(which was rather late for me) –
Between the end of the Chatterley ban
And the Beatles’ first LP.

Up to then there’d only been
A sort of bargaining,
A wrangle for the ring,
A shame that started at sixteen
And spread to everything.

Then all at once the quarrel sank:
Everyone felt the same,
And every life became
A brilliant breaking of the bank,
A quite unlosable game.

So life was never better than
In nineteen sixty-three
(Though just too late for me) –
Between the end of the Chatterley ban
And the Beatles’ first LP.

lovethisconcept
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lovethisconcept
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January 30, 2024 1:22 pm

Grace was without question a huge talent and was part of a powerful movement in rock and roll. But she was also kind of a jerk.

Aaron3000
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Aaron3000
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January 30, 2024 9:56 pm

I’m reminded of this short film from 1952, a full dozen years before Beatlemania, but she may as well have been talking about the Fab Four:

https://youtube.com/clip/Ugkx4od_UNm0S5V5V2m9Zxf3gZ0YZEA9c__P?si=k-FF4zdXZXHad4ha

Last edited 5 months ago by Aaron3000
cstolliver
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January 30, 2024 10:36 am

Great collection, Professor! I would agree that it must have been a fascinating time to be alive. That may sound strange, since I *was* alive then, but I was 5 months old and in my playpen at the time of The Beatles on Ed Sullivan. My response to all that screaming might have been less “Yeah, yeah, yeah” and more “Wah, wah, wah”!

Last edited 5 months ago by Chuck Small
blu_cheez
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January 30, 2024 3:05 pm
Phylum of Alexandria
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January 30, 2024 3:20 pm

Objectively speaking, “Surfin’ Bird” is the greatest song that will ever exist.

“I Wanna Hold Your Hand” sounds positively raunchy to me. Not the lyrics of course. I think it’s the swaggering verse melodies couple with those decadent hand claps. The chorus is basically a fig leaf, plausible cover for the pervy energy of the rest of the song. Come give me diner ham!

Virgindog
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January 30, 2024 5:03 pm

I don’t have a daughter but I’ve just decided that if I did, I’d suggest “Surfin’ Bird” for our father/daughter dance at her wedding.

sieglinde
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January 30, 2024 10:43 pm

I thought I had never heard “Popsicles & Icicles” before, but it gave me strong moments of deja vu flashing back to a summer vacation by a lake in… 1967. Maybe it took songs three years to get there, I don’t know. But I think it got lodged in my subconscious when I was 5 and hearing it now pried it out. And I doubt there’s any reason I would have heard it in the intervening 50+ years, even in that breakfast restaurant somewhere west of Sault Ste Marie Michigan in 2000, which was totally out of 1964.

And it the Leslie Gore version of “You Don’t Own Me” doesn’t feel right. Klaus Nomi has owned that song since the 80s.

sieglinde
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January 30, 2024 10:46 pm

I think it was in Spider-Man #136 where Mary Jane Watson tells Peter Parker his musical tastes were so 1964. She wasn’t referring to any of the tunes in this list (well, maybe the Murmaids one).

Low4
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January 31, 2024 4:32 pm

Oh man! I absolutely agree that the ’60s began in 1964 (’63 in the UK) with the arrival of the Beatles and the invasion they sparked. You’re right about the energy too. Even today, when I listen to those early Beatles songs I’m amazed, joyful, and puzzled by the insane amounts of energy they managed to pack into the grooves of those records. How? How did they do that?

I was four at the time, and their appearance on Sullivan is one of my first concrete/attachable memories. I also especially remember the reactions of my 15yo brother and middle-aged dad. Let’s just say that their opinions differed.

Yes, of course there was good music (particularly soul) on the charts before the Beatles arrived, but they marked a seismic shift, and in sooooo many ways.

Over on the mothership I occasionally catch flack due to my lack of knowledge of (and interest in) post-Nirvana music and for my love of ’60s music. Of course a lot of charting music in the ’60s was crap, just like every decade, but this column hits at what was just down the road and just what made the period so amazing. When you turned on the radio in those days you got such a wide variety of music: Beatles, James Brown, Paul Revere/Raiders, Four Tops, Box Tops, Ray Charles, Byrds, Martha and the Vandellas, and on and on. Truly a great time to be a fan of popular music.

LinkCrawford
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February 1, 2024 12:32 pm

I am happy to hear every song in this list, but if I had to put one on a pedestal, it would be “Surfin’ Bird”, which is just more fun than any song has a right to be.

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